Contemplations

Teaching Composition with Interactive Fiction, Part Two

Sep 14th, 2013 | By
Plotkin's tutorial game

In an earlier post, I explained why I think interactive fiction (IF) computer games can drive valuable experiments in the multimodal composition classroom.  You can check out Part One for an overview of what IF is and what I think it can do for students.  In the present post, I’ll lay out a few more

[continue reading...]



Britt Fellow Goes Bibliophile

Jun 21st, 2013 | By
lamour

It always seems self-contradictory to proffer sage career advice to fellow teachers and academics. I am not too far removed from the realm of the Brittain Fellows, having been one from 2007-2008. Like you, I walked among the hallowed halls of Skiles and watched the ever-fluctuating stream of students, many convinced they were born to

[continue reading...]



Anatomy of the Bubble Girl

Jun 4th, 2013 | By
bubble girl

The moment Diane Jakacki showed me a picture of the Bubble Girl being chased by a bent but strangely menacing Prince Charles, I knew I had to write something about memes. That’s probably an exaggeration. I did laugh a lot. And I did do some investigating. Turns out Chubby Bubble Girl is part of an entire

[continue reading...]



Teaching Composition with Interactive Fiction

May 2nd, 2013 | By
Note, in this excerpt from Plotkin's tutorial game, how the player-character and the narrative voice take turns typing to each other.

Regular readers of TECHStyle may remember my mentioning, back in September, my plans to use interactive fiction (“IF”) computer games in my multimodal composition classes.  After two semesters of teaching students to read, play, and write IF games, I can say that the experiment was mostly a success.  While we faced a few frustrations (largely

[continue reading...]



A Model for Mentoring

Apr 11th, 2013 | By
chart1

The Writing and Communication Program has an ongoing initiative to provide mentoring to first year post-doctorates looking to further professionalize as they make their way to full time positions. As a new Brittain Fellow, I – Peter Fontaine – was paired with LMC faculty member, Dr. Krystina Madej. I had been both a mentor and

[continue reading...]



Paulo Freire is Not a Mildly Spicy Casserole (Another Tech No, to Tech, Yes column)

Mar 28th, 2013 | By
4f2c6ebba9490s20041

I recently read Cathy Davidson’s “Let’s Talk about MOOC (online) Education–And Also About Massively Outdated Traditional Education (MOTEs)” on the HASTAC [the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory] blog.  I agree with her argument that talking heads do not a MOOC make (nor do they help digital pedagogy in general). I particularly like her

[continue reading...]



Go Make Yourself Un-useful

Feb 25th, 2013 | By
sara

In a previous post, I reflected on the successes and failures of a project I assigned in my Spring 2012 course on copia, and assigned again with some minor changes this semester. Students spend the first month of the semester gathering an eclectic mix of material, organizing it into categories, and publishing it in a

[continue reading...]



Infinite 1102: A Collective Romp Through Infinite Jest, Part I

Jan 24th, 2013 | By
prezi2

  1079 pages. 388 footnotes.  2 lbs 10 oz (and that’s the paperback). David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest is nothing if not formidable. It languishes on many a “to-read” shelf alongside Joyce’s Ulysses and Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow. Despite its intimidation factor, Infinite Jest can be a pretty accessible read, and it is absolutely a rewarding one. Infinite Jest

[continue reading...]



Tech, No to Tech, Yes: How a Former Technophobe Becomes a Digital Teaching Fellow, Part 2

Jan 13th, 2013 | By
facepalm

Happy New Year and New Semester! My fellow teachers won’t be surprised to hear that I didn’t get a chance to finish another post last semester. But that delay turned into an opportunity to reflect at the end of my first semester teaching in a highly digital environment. What follows is a list that isn’t

[continue reading...]



Tech Gets Medieval Symposium!

Nov 6th, 2012 | By
189670488_5233f87a6e_m

On Tuesday, November 13, the Writing and Communication Program will sponsor a symposium on How Medieval Technology Can Teach the Past. The symposium will foreground the ways in which knowledge of history informs technological development today and allows faculty from different programs and schools across Georgia Tech to collaborate and discuss pedagogical methodologies used to

[continue reading...]