Digital Pedagogy

Mock Interviews with Contemporary African American Writers

Apr 18th, 2014 | By

My “English 1102: African American Literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the Digital Present” students’ final assignment this term was a version of one that Anne Sexton gave in her “Anne on Anne” course at Colgate University in the spring of 1972. Sexton taught a class on her own poetry and her teaching notes for it are in

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Mapping Jacob’s Room

Nov 12th, 2013 | By
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In my English 1102 “Digital Woolf” class at Georgia Tech this fall, we began with Howards End (1910), by Virginia Woolf’s contemporary, E. M. Forster, which we followed with Woolf’s novels, Jacob’s Room (1922), Mrs. Dalloway (1925), and To the Lighthouse (1927).[1] We will be concluding the course with her essay, A Room of One’s

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My Next Job Will Be At Starfleet Academy (Another Tech, No to Tech, Yes Column)

Nov 7th, 2013 | By
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We were fans of Star Trek.  Sure, we thought: people will travel through space, we’ll meet with beings from other planets, we’ll fly space ships, and for work, we’ll hold flat, thin computers in one hand and tea in the other, the simulated daylight shining ever-so-slightly off our bald pates.  Sure, that will happen, because

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Telling Stories, Building Community: “This I Believe” in the First-Year Writing and Communication Classroom

Oct 4th, 2013 | By
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In the spring of 2011, Georgia Tech started a “This I Believe” project in partnership with the Writing and Communication Program. The campus reading series and student contest are unofficial off-shoots of a popular radio series, originally hosted by Edward R. Murrow in the 1950s, and then resuscitated on NPR from 2005-2009. The radio essays

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Teaching Composition with Interactive Fiction, Part Two

Sep 14th, 2013 | By
Plotkin's tutorial game

In an earlier post, I explained why I think interactive fiction (IF) computer games can drive valuable experiments in the multimodal composition classroom.  You can check out Part One for an overview of what IF is and what I think it can do for students.  In the present post, I’ll lay out a few more

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Notes from DragonCon: Teaching Multimodal Literacy with Comics

Sep 11th, 2013 | By
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This weekend I participated in a panel on “Teaching Multimodal Literacy with Comics” at DragonCon here in Atlanta. The panel was part of the Comics and Popular Culture Conference which is held concurrently with DragonCon. Other panelists included my Brittain Fellow colleague Noah Mass and Andy Runton, an Eisner Award-winning cartoonist who is also a

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Teaching Composition with Interactive Fiction

May 2nd, 2013 | By
Note, in this excerpt from Plotkin's tutorial game, how the player-character and the narrative voice take turns typing to each other.

Regular readers of TECHStyle may remember my mentioning, back in September, my plans to use interactive fiction (“IF”) computer games in my multimodal composition classes.  After two semesters of teaching students to read, play, and write IF games, I can say that the experiment was mostly a success.  While we faced a few frustrations (largely

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Paulo Freire is Not a Mildly Spicy Casserole (Another Tech No, to Tech, Yes column)

Mar 28th, 2013 | By
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I recently read Cathy Davidson’s “Let’s Talk about MOOC (online) Education–And Also About Massively Outdated Traditional Education (MOTEs)” on the HASTAC [the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory] blog.  I agree with her argument that talking heads do not a MOOC make (nor do they help digital pedagogy in general). I particularly like her

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Propose a THATCamp Session!

Feb 20th, 2013 | By

Plans for THATCamp Southeast, to be held March 9th & 10th, are moving right along.  The organizers (myself included!) are very happy to announce two things: It’s time to Propose a Session!  Please check this link and think about what YOU want to use THATCamp to accomplish.  Then propose something related to it! We are

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Infinite 1102: A Collective Romp Through Infinite Jest, Part I

Jan 24th, 2013 | By
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  1079 pages. 388 footnotes.  2 lbs 10 oz (and that’s the paperback). David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest is nothing if not formidable. It languishes on many a “to-read” shelf alongside Joyce’s Ulysses and Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow. Despite its intimidation factor, Infinite Jest can be a pretty accessible read, and it is absolutely a rewarding one. Infinite Jest

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