Framing Media Studies, Part II: Cinematography

By Clint Stivers and Phoebe Bronstein In the last post, we discussed mise en scene–everything that is put/placed in the scene–and so for this post, we are moving on to cinematography. Cinematography refers to what the camera does from framing, to focus, and movement. In early filmmaking cameras were heavier,… Continue reading

Now Accepting Applications for the 2014-2015 Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship

Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship Composition, Technical Communication, and Digital Pedagogy The Writing and Communication Program at Georgia Tech seeks recent PhDs in English, literature, rhetoric, composition, technical communication, film, linguistics, visual rhetoric/design, and related humanities fields for the Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship. The fellowship, renewable up to three years, includes… Continue reading

Framing Media Studies: Teaching Cinematic Style, Part I

By Phoebe Bronstein and Clint Stivers As teachers of multimodal/WOVEN artifacts, we naturally understand how to teach students how to arrange images for effective designs in posters, presentations, infographics, and other visual mediums. Despite having experience in visual rhetoric, some teachers express difficulty in how to approach teaching film. In… Continue reading

The V in WOVEN: Student Posters and the Rhetoric of Waste

 In this post, I’d like to write about student posters and start/continue a conversation about the importance of the V in WOVEN. The Rhetoric of Waste and Sustainability: Teaching writing at Georgia Tech, an institution that prides itself with training problem-solvers, I invite my students to use multimodal communication as… Continue reading

Telling Stories, Building Community: “This I Believe” in the First-Year Writing and Communication Classroom

In the spring of 2011, Georgia Tech started a “This I Believe” project in partnership with the Writing and Communication Program. The campus reading series and student contest are unofficial off-shoots of a popular radio series, originally hosted by Edward R. Murrow in the 1950s, and then resuscitated on NPR… Continue reading

Notes from DragonCon: Teaching Multimodal Literacy with Comics

This weekend I participated in a panel on “Teaching Multimodal Literacy with Comics” at DragonCon here in Atlanta. The panel was part of the Comics and Popular Culture Conference which is held concurrently with DragonCon. Other panelists included my Brittain Fellow colleague Noah Mass and Andy Runton, an Eisner Award-winning… Continue reading

Untouchable E-Books: Mulk Raj Anand, Modernism, and Technology

My English 1102 “Modernism: Technology and Communication” course last spring asked how people around the world communicated before the internet. Starting with the advent of the telegraph, we addressed written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal forms of communication through the nineteen thirties. We began the course with Tom Standage’s The… Continue reading

Anatomy of the Bubble Girl

The moment Diane Jakacki showed me a picture of the Bubble Girl being chased by a bent but strangely menacing Prince Charles, I knew I had to write something about memes. That’s probably an exaggeration. I did laugh a lot. And I did do some investigating. Turns out Chubby Bubble Girl… Continue reading

A New Podcast, Featuring Colonel Hall!

  We are pleased to present the second podcast in TechStyle’s podcast series! Our second episode features Colonel Stephen C. Hall, USAF Retired, 1967 Graduate of Georgia Tech, and the namesake of our new home, the Stephen C. Hall Writing and Communication Building, on the Georgia Tech campus.  The podcast… Continue reading

Paulo Freire is Not a Mildly Spicy Casserole (Another Tech No, to Tech, Yes column)

I recently read Cathy Davidson’s “Let’s Talk about MOOC (online) Education–And Also About Massively Outdated Traditional Education (MOTEs)” on the HASTAC [the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory] blog.  I agree with her argument that talking heads do not a MOOC make (nor do they help digital pedagogy in… Continue reading

Hidden Talents Brought to Light: Student View Exhibition on Display at the Ferst Center Galleries

We may not think of future scientists, mathematicians, and engineers as artists and storytellers whose work appeals to our aesthetic sensibilities. Student View, an annual exhibition of artifacts launched in 2012 as part of a collaborative effort by the Writing and Communication Program and the Ferst Center to promote innovative… Continue reading

Go Make Yourself Un-useful

In a previous post, I reflected on the successes and failures of a project I assigned in my Spring 2012 course on copia, and assigned again with some minor changes this semester. Students spend the first month of the semester gathering an eclectic mix of material, organizing it into categories,… Continue reading

Anticipating THATCamp

I’ve been a member of the digital humanities community here at Georgia Tech for the past year and a half (+!) and yet here I am, THATCamp-less.  It’s a shame.  I’m ashamed!  THATCamp is one of the hallmarks of what we at the Brittain Fellowship try to do on a… Continue reading

Research News from the CommLab

At Georgia Tech, the Communication Center (or CommLab, as it is popularly known) is part of the Writing and Communication Program. The program’s commitment to the principles of WOVEN communication (i.e. Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic, and Non-verbal) has inspired instructors to design courses that develop and refine rhetorical skills in multiple media… Continue reading

Infinite 1102: A Collective Romp Through Infinite Jest, Part I

  1079 pages. 388 footnotes.  2 lbs 10 oz (and that’s the paperback). David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest is nothing if not formidable. It languishes on many a “to-read” shelf alongside Joyce’s Ulysses and Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow. Despite its intimidation factor, Infinite Jest can be a pretty accessible read, and it is absolutely… Continue reading

Now Accepting Applications for the 2013-2014 Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship

Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship in Composition, Technical Communication, and Digital Pedagogy The Writing and Communication Program at Georgia Tech seeks recent PhDs in English, literature, rhetoric, composition, technical communication, film, linguistics, visual rhetoric/design, and related humanities fields for the Brittain Postdoctoral Fellowship. The fellowship, renewable up to three years, includes… Continue reading

Tech, No to Tech, Yes: How a Former Technophobe Becomes a Digital Teaching Fellow, Part 2

Happy New Year and New Semester! My fellow teachers won’t be surprised to hear that I didn’t get a chance to finish another post last semester. But that delay turned into an opportunity to reflect at the end of my first semester teaching in a highly digital environment. What follows… Continue reading

Who’s Chasing Whom? Utility, Metamorphosis & the Humanities

An article showed up on my facebook feed recently: “College Tuition Should Vary By Degree, Florida State Task Force Says.” The gist of it is this: “Tuition would be lower for students pursuing degrees most needed for Florida’s job market, including ones in science, technology, engineering and math, collectively known… Continue reading

The “Curse of Knowledge”: Adapting the Principles of Stony Brook University’s Center for Communicating Science to Georgia Tech

Alan Alda with short, brown haired girl.

At Stony Brook University, where I spent my Fall Break, I learned all about the Curse of Knowledge … from Alan Alda.  A few feet away from me, Alda gave the keynote speech at the Center for Communicating Science’s Fall Institute, explaining passionately that once we know something really well,… Continue reading

Hate Studies and the Holocaust Memorial Museum

What is hate, and how do we combat it?  Recently, I attended a symposium organized by Gonzaga University’s Institute for Hate Studies and American University’s Washington College of Law.  The symposium was on “Hate and Political Discourse” and was organized by John Shuford and Robert Tsai in honor of the… Continue reading

Fiction and Veteran Experience

by Jennifer Orth-Veillon Memorial Day, July 4th, 9-11, Veterans Day. Over the past year, I have spent each of these commemorative holidays planning and teaching my English 1101 course, “American Veterans and the Non-Traditional Memoir.” While helping students improve their writing and communication skills, the class examines the way veteran… Continue reading

Tech, No to Tech, Yes: How a Former Technophobe Becomes a Digital Teaching Fellow

An ongoing series by new Brittain Fellow, Rebecca Weaver I am a new Brittain Fellow in Digital Pedagogy at Georgia Institute of Technology, where I teach a 21st Century version of First-Year Writing. This class focuses on the WOVEN curriculum, a broader curriculum of communication than that of traditional writing… Continue reading