Comm Lab Opens!

Communication Center: Our Space

Dr. Leeann Hunter working with a student

We designed Georgia Tech’s Communication Center to be a leading-edge model for communication education. From its design in the Communication Center Task Force Report in 2007, the Communication Center has presented a strong vision: It not only includes CommLab (with multiple kinds of tutoring and practice spaces for writing and design), but it also includes four Rehearsal Studios (with multiple spaces for coaching presentations and small group interactions as well as providing opportunities for student to use the spaces for presentation rehearsals). In addition, the Communication Center has two offices (for the new Director and her two Assistant Directors), two small group meeting and conferencing rooms, a Resource Room for tutor meetings, and a storage space. In addition to the two Assistant Directors, there are five professional tutors–all of whom hold PhDs in a communication-related disciplines. Later this year, peer-tutors will begin working in the space, and plans to include Research Tutors from the Library and ESL Tutors from the Language Institute are also being developed.

Communication Center: Our History

Rendering of the Clough University Learning Commons rooftop garden

Before this new Communication Center, Georgia Tech has never had a campus-wide communication resource. Having the Communication Center be part of the Writing and Communication Program provides a clear message — that we designed this center to support our multimodal curriculum as well as to support campus-wide communication needs. We’re one of the few communication centers in the country to have such a close and articulated relationship between the curriculum and the tutoring/coaching support for that curriculum. And we’re one of the few communication centers in the country to have a research-based program — a center explicitly built on research and a center with research as an explicit and expected outcome.

Diane Jakacki

About Diane Jakacki

Diane Jakacki received her PhD from the University of Waterloo, where she specialized in early modern printed drama, and participated in federally-funded digital humanities research projects. She has published two articles on applying social semiotic methods to early modern theatre history, an edition of Wit and Science, and co-authored an essay on developing digital image annotation tools. She is a software consultant to imageMAT and the Records of Early English Drama. At Georgia Tech she applies digital humanities methods to pedagogical solutions. Jakacki is currently developing researching the Elizabethan clown Richard Tarlton and his touring relationship with the Queen’s Men troupe.
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