Public Tech Comm: Preparing Students for Tech Expos

Rows of lunchboxes are lined up on a table. Each box has a label with the words "Junior Design Capstone Expo" and an image of two people trying virtual reality technology.

This is the fourth part in a series on the intersections of technical communication in the tech industry and the academy. Read the series introduction here. One of the more interesting aspects of the Computer Science Tech Comm Course sequence at Georgia Tech is how it evolves from semester to… Continue reading

Strategies for Teaching Non-Native English Speakers: A Roundtable Review

On March 30, 2017, the Writing and Communication Program’s World Englishes Committee hosted the faculty roundtable “Instructing Non-Native English Speakers: Practical Tools.” This event drew Georgia Tech teaching faculty and staff interested in sharing ideas and learning new strategies for better serving the needs of the diverse population of English… Continue reading

Brittain Fellows Celebrate Teaching with Posters about Pedagogy

 On March 14, 2017, the Georgia Tech teaching community gathered for Celebrating Teaching Day, a demonstration of the innovative pedagogies that feature in courses across Tech, put on by the Center for Teaching and Learning. The inventive work of Brittain Fellows was on prominent display during the day’s events via a series… Continue reading

Reframing Multilingualism in the Classroom: A Poetic Celebration of Diversity

The World Englishes Committee invites you to a poetic celebration of diversity at Georgia Tech. Sponsored by Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program, the event will feature international Georgia Tech students reading poetry from their home countries, both in the original language and in English, and conclude with a question and answer… Continue reading

STUDENT VIEW opens Wednesday, 2/26*

Each year, more than 6,000 Georgia Tech undergraduates enroll in courses offered by the Writing and Communication Program (WCP), whose home is in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. These multimodal courses are designed and taught by Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellows. To showcase students’ artistic work created in… Continue reading

“The Language of Tech Comm: Teaching Technical Communication From a Humanities Perspective.”

On Tuesday, February 18, from 11-12 PM in Hall 102, the Communication Colloquium presents “The Language of Tech Comm: Teaching Technical Communication From a Humanities Perspective.” LMC 3403: Technical Communication is a course that places an emphasis on workplace communication and that helps third- and fourth-year undergraduates learn strategies necessary for creating… Continue reading

Student View Previewed at Woodruff Arts Center’s Georgia Tech Night

On February 7, student artwork created in the Institute’s first-year writing and communication courses (English 1101/1102) and other communication-related LMC courses was featured at Georgia Tech Night at the Woodruff Arts Center.  This exhibition, organized by the Writing and Communication Program’s Arts Initiatives Committee, previewed select digital artifacts from this… Continue reading

Anticipating THATCamp

I’ve been a member of the digital humanities community here at Georgia Tech for the past year and a half (+!) and yet here I am, THATCamp-less.  It’s a shame.  I’m ashamed!  THATCamp is one of the hallmarks of what we at the Brittain Fellowship try to do on a… Continue reading

Tech Gets Medieval Symposium!

On Tuesday, November 13, the Writing and Communication Program will sponsor a symposium on How Medieval Technology Can Teach the Past. The symposium will foreground the ways in which knowledge of history informs technological development today and allows faculty from different programs and schools across Georgia Tech to collaborate and… Continue reading

“Tech Gets Medieval” and Other Ways We Teach the Past

For many instructors, teaching about the past can be problematic, especially to Georgia Tech students who may have little interest in any time period that predates their existence, or who may have the interest, but don’t see how such topics can aid them in their pursuit of a STEM degree…. Continue reading

Shetty Publishes Picture Book

Third-year Brittain Fellow Malavika Shetty’s new children’s book, The Sweetest Mango, has just been published by Tulika Books. The picture book, illustrated by Ajanta Guhathakurta, is written for children five years and older. and is available in English, Hindi, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Marathi, Gujarati, and Bengali. Please follow and like us: Continue reading

RSA Gets Schooled!

Diane Jakacki and Tom Lolis (2nd year Britts) presented on Digital Pedagogy and Early Modern Studies at the Renaissance Society of America conference in Washington DC on March 23. Three sessions, sponsored by the Centre for Renaissance and Reformation Studies and organized by Jakacki, featured nine speakers and a roundtable… Continue reading

Former Brittain Fellow Klein Tweets w/ Times & Produces Popular Podcasts

Here is some digital pedagogy news from former Brittain Fellow Sipai Klein Tweet! Clayton State New York Times Talk on Twitter, Civic Engagement and Knowledge, March 30 Morrow, Ga., Mar. 27, 2012 — Clayton State University’s partnership with the New York Times continued on Friday, Mar. 30, with a New York Times Talk that focused on one of the… Continue reading

Munro Focuses on Photography and Racial Anxiety

Julia Munro presents at the Northeast Modern Language Association 2012 conference in Rochester, New York (March 16-18). Her paper — “‘It Tells a Story to the Eye’: Photography and Visualizations of Racial Anxiety” — is part of the panel, “Sex, Blood, and Hybridity: The Discourse of Racial Anxiety in Antebellum Writing,”… Continue reading

Nothing to See Here, Folks!

Christine Hoffmann’s paper—”Nothing to See Here, Folks: Milton’s Art of Disappearance”—explores the ways in which disappearance gives the impression of vitality in Milton’s Paradise Lost. Milton broadly realizes the possibilities of fallibility, failure and fallenness through his own illegible posture as the poet vainly presuming to write Eden, and he… Continue reading

Michelle Gibbons published in journal Philosophy of Science

Michelle Gibbons has a recent publication, “Reassessing Discovery: Rosalind Franklin, Scientific Visualization, and the Structure of DNA,” which appears in the current issue of Philosophy of Science.

Gibbons, Michelle G. “Reassessing Discovery: Rosalind Franklin, Scientific Visualization, and the Structure of DNA.” Philosophy of Science 79 (2012): 63-80.
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