Christine Hoffmann

About Christine Hoffmann

Christine Hoffmann (PhD University of Arkansas, MFA Art Institute of Chicago) studies the shifting standards for credibility and utility that develop inside post-Gutenberg and post-digital rhetorical environments. Her scholarly work has been published in College Literature, the CEA Critic, PLL, the CEA Forum and, somewhat randomly, Slayage: the Online Journal of Buffy Studies. A few short stories can be found in Make magazine, Eclectica and Loose Change. She also blogs regularly on TECHStyle, the forum for digital pedagogy and research by the Georgia Tech Brittain Fellows. Christine looks forward to connecting the teaching of multimodal composition to her research into rhetorics of struggle, cultures of collecting, and the advantages of copious expression.

Taking on the Trivial in English 1102


When this school year began, everyone was talking about the GT convocation video that went viral. “You can do that!” was the theme of the speech, where “that” meant things like changing the world, crushing the shoulders of giants, and building the Iron Man Suit. Big ideas! Big risks! Epic theme music! It was an inspiring speech, and how refreshing to see a student who understands that presentations are also performances (I have a hard … Continue reading

Reframing Multilingualism in the Classroom: A Poetic Celebration of Diversity


The World Englishes Committee invites you to a poetic celebration of diversity at Georgia Tech. Sponsored by Georgia Tech’s Writing and Communication Program, the event will feature international Georgia Tech students reading poetry from their home countries, both in the original language and in English, and conclude with a question and answer panel discussion of innovative teaching methods that incorporate the diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds of Georgia Tech students.  Please consider joining us for an event … Continue reading

Grace Bauer: Nowhere All At Once (And Everything Else)


You are invited to hear poet, scholar, and teacher Grace Bauer read from and discuss her newest collection, Nowhere All At Once. Grace Bauer, recipient of Academy of American Poets Prize and the Idaho Poetry Prize, was a 2009 nominee for the National Poets’ Prize. Ms. Bauer’s newest collections of poems include Nowhere All At Once (Stephen F. Austin University Press, 2014) and Café Culture (Imaginary Friend Press, 2013). Her work has been published in a wide variety of journals, and she … Continue reading

Christina Van Houten publishes in Politics and Culture

Read Christina Van Houten’s contribution to Materialist Feminisms Against Neoliberalism, a special edition of Politics and Culture. “bell hooks, Critical Regionalism, and the Politics of Ecological Returns”  addresses the ways in which bell hooks’ thinking turns to a politics of critical regionalism, by tracing a line that discursively connects materialist feminism, antiracist activism, and ecological Marxism… To access the  full article, click here. Tweet This Post

STUDENT VIEW opens Wednesday, 2/26*

student view

Each year, more than 6,000 Georgia Tech undergraduates enroll in courses offered by the Writing and Communication Program (WCP), whose home is in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication. These multimodal courses are designed and taught by Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellows. To showcase students’ artistic work created in these classes, the WCP partners with the Office of the Arts to present Student View, an annual juried exhibition. The artwork in Student View epitomizes the provocative synergy … Continue reading

“The Language of Tech Comm: Teaching Technical Communication From a Humanities Perspective.”

Colloquium draft(1)

On Tuesday, February 18, from 11-12 PM in Hall 102, the Communication Colloquium presents “The Language of Tech Comm: Teaching Technical Communication From a Humanities Perspective.” LMC 3403: Technical Communication is a course that places an emphasis on workplace communication and that helps third- and fourth-year undergraduates learn strategies necessary for creating technical artifacts. In addition, the course helps students learn strategies for communicating with diverse audiences in technical and scientific fields. Although many of the instructors … Continue reading

Christine Hoffmann publishes in Rhizomes


Christine Hoffmann’s essay “Middling Through Somehow: Queer Temporality and the Disaster Meme,” has been published in Issue 26 of Rhizomes: Cultural Studies in Emerging Knowledge. The essay discusses copia and the anxieties that surround abundance of expression in 21st-century online discourse. In (rhetorical) theory, copia promotes stability, correspondence and perfect knowledge; in practice, transgression and fragmentation. Disaster memes, Hoffmann argues, are particularly transgressive in their non-linearity and non-correspondence. They provoke a critique of normative historiography. for … Continue reading