The Office Hour, Chapter 7: “’90s D*** Dads”

Last week, we heard Toby reflect on his thoughts and experiences as both an academic and as a father. This week, Brittain Fellow Owen Cantrell and I (neither of whom have any children) discuss a very different kind of father: the “’90s Dick Dad,” as exemplified by Tim Allen in The… Continue reading

A Good Marriage Is a WOVEN Marriage: Multimodal Communication in and out of the Classroom

My English 1102 class, “Odd Victorian Bodies,” uses the lens of nineteenth-century British literature to study the concepts of multimodal–or WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal)–communication. The class reads Victorian novels, short stories, and poetry that deal explicitly with bodies. In addition to learning about a historical time period,… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 6: Academic Dad

In this brief episode, Toby attempts to comment on academic parenting (and fatherhood in particular) . . . while academic parenting. His comments are drawn from Aviva Shen’s article on student perception and gender bias, Apoorva Mandavilli’s New York Times piece on representation in academia, Dale Edwin Murray’s Times Higher Education essay on the impossibility… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 5: “The Ferrante Affair”

In this episode, Toby and I discuss the controversy surrounding the publication of Italian journalist Claudio Gatti’s “Elena Ferrante: An Answer?” and “The Story Behind a Name” in The New York Review of Books this past weekend. Having never read any of Ferrante’s knowledge, we rely quite heavily on Alexandra Schwartz’s analysis in The New… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 4: “Marzoni on Cassavetes”

In this highly anticipated episode, Toby interviews me about the work of filmmaker John Cassavetes using questions written by his wife, Candice Wilson, Assistant Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of North Georgia, Gainesville. The podcast can be played using the embedded player above or downloaded as… Continue reading

Selfish Researchers, Neglectful Educators: Student Misconceptions of What We Do

Here is an example of a popular meme depicting how different groups might understand the role of the professor. Friends may believe professors have summers off; parents may liken them to a school teacher; society may assume they show students movies to pass the time. Although I wouldn’t liken what… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 3: “Contrarianism Mixed with Privilege”

In this episode, Toby and I discuss the Ginkgo Tree in Skiles Courtyard at Georgia Tech (pictured above) before moving on to discuss nostalgia and the work of Marcel Proust, Gérard Genette, Walter Benjamin, and Jörg Zimmer, and once again deferring our conversation about John Cassavetes to a future podcast…. Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 2: “The Hermeneutics of Suspicion”

In this episode (named after a phrase borrowed from Paul Ricoeur), Toby and I talk to Anna Ioanes, Brittain Fellow and co-editor of TECHStyle, about her article “Shock and Consent in a Feminist Avant-Garde: Kathleen Hanna Reads Kathy Acker,” which appeared in the Autumn 2016 issue of Signs: Journal of Women and Culture in… Continue reading

Talking as Artists: Oral Communication in the Gallery Space

In July 2015, The Chronicle of Higher Education ran an article entitled “Final Exams or Epic Finales.” In it, Anthony Crider, an associate professor of Physics at Elon University, describes how and why he ends his courses not with exams, but with “epic finales.” These epic finales can take many… Continue reading

4.33@Tech, Episode 2: “#justanotherday”

The second episode of 4.33@Tech is “justanotherday.” It features the interview Lauren Neefe and student producer Prachi Sahoo did with Radiolab‘s Jad Abumrad before his talk at Georgia Tech’s Ferst Center for the Arts in October 2015. They talk about telling stories with sound, how Jad imagines his radio audience, a Big Bang moment… Continue reading

Student View 2016

A signature event for the Writing and Communication Program, Student View once again featured outstanding student work from English 1101 and 1102, as well as various Literature, Media, and Communication courses. For the first time ever, the exhibit was hosted in the Stephen C. Hall Building, home of the Writing and Communication… Continue reading

Brittain Fellow Posters from Celebrating Teaching Day 2016

  On Tuesday, March 15, a number of Brittain Fellows and Writing and Communication Program Lecturers showcased their work at Georgia Tech’s Celebrating Teaching Day celebration. Brittain Fellows and Lecturers use a wide range of multimodal activities and assignments in their classes, as their posters demonstrate. The posters can be viewed… Continue reading

Mapping Burroughs’s Junky

While Jack Kerouac’s On the Road (1957) is usually remembered as the quintessential American road novel, the slightly earlier debut novel of Kerouac’s friend and fellow Beat William S. Burroughs, Junky (1953), is equally expansive in its exploration of the North American continent. Kerouac’s roman à clef—first mapped by the… Continue reading

H. Rider Haggard’s Adventure Novel and Multimodal Composition

One of the challenges of teaching literature in a multimodal communication course is to keep students focused on the task at hand—becoming effective communicators—while also teaching the literary work as an artifact with all its history, cultural significance, and metaphorical complexities.  While I think nearly any cultural artifact from an… Continue reading

Archiving Other Worlds: Science Fiction Magazines as Multimodal Artifacts

When first designing my English 1102 course, Multimodal Mars, I wanted to integrate the Georgia Tech Science Fiction Collection, which contains a large number of magazines such as Planet Stories, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and Astounding Stories (among others). My reason for this was twofold: I felt that students would better… Continue reading

Flash Readings, Episode 3: “A Safe Imaginative Space”

The third episode of Flash Readings with the Brittain Fellows is “A Safe Imaginative Space,” featuring Ellen Stockstill’s interview with Sarah Higinbotham about the meaningful ways that children of many ages respond to Dr. Seuss’s “The Sneetches” (1961) and her work on Human Rights in Children’s Literature: Imagination and the… Continue reading