A Good Marriage Is a WOVEN Marriage: Multimodal Communication in and out of the Classroom

Brighton writes that "A Good Marriage is a WOVEN Marriage." Photograph courtesy of the author.

My English 1102 class, “Odd Victorian Bodies,” uses the lens of nineteenth-century British literature to study the concepts of multimodal–or WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal)–communication. The class reads Victorian novels, short stories, and poetry that deal explicitly with bodies. In addition to learning about a historical time period,… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 6: Academic Dad


In this brief episode, Toby attempts to comment on academic parenting (and fatherhood in particular) . . . while academic parenting. His comments are drawn from Aviva Shen’s article on student perception and gender bias, Apoorva Mandavilli’s New York Times piece on representation in academia, Dale Edwin Murray’s Times Higher Education essay on the impossibility… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 5: “The Ferrante Affair”


In this episode, Toby and I discuss the controversy surrounding the publication of Italian journalist Claudio Gatti’s “Elena Ferrante: An Answer?” and “The Story Behind a Name” in The New York Review of Books this past weekend. Having never read any of Ferrante’s knowledge, we rely quite heavily on Alexandra Schwartz’s analysis in The New… Continue reading

The Office Hour, Chapter 4: “Marzoni on Cassavetes”


In this highly anticipated episode, Toby interviews me about the work of filmmaker John Cassavetes using questions written by his wife, Candice Wilson, Assistant Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of North Georgia, Gainesville. The podcast can be played using the embedded player above or downloaded as… Continue reading

Selfish Researchers, Neglectful Educators: Student Misconceptions of What We Do


Here is an example of a popular meme depicting how different groups might understand the role of the professor. Friends may believe professors have summers off; parents may liken them to a school teacher; society may assume they show students movies to pass the time. Although I wouldn’t liken what… Continue reading